Archive for April, 2011

Eddies found to be deep, powerful modes of ocean transport connecting atmospheric events and deep ocean

This item was filled under Climate
Massive, swirling ocean eddies -- known to be up to 500 kilometers across at the surface -- can reach all the way to the ocean bottom at mid-ocean ridges, some 2,500 meters deep, transporting tiny sea creatures, chemicals, and heat from hydrothermal vents over large distances....

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MEET: Jenny Vander Pluym [People of NOS]

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"As a research technician for the Center's Applied Ecology and Restoration Research branch, I do a little bit of everything! Our research focuses on habitat mapping, ecology, and restoration, which means I assess various marine and coastal habitats by collecting data in the field using scuba, photographic, and wading techniques. Once the data is collected, I enter, analyze, and summarize the data, which is then described in reports and scientific publications detailing our research results. I work in Beaufort, North Carolina, and my main projects are in the South Atlantic."...

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Record number of whales, krill found in Antarctic bays

This item was filled under Climate
Scientists have observed a "super aggregation" of more than 300 humpback whales gorging on the largest swarm of Antarctic krill seen in more than 20 years in bays along the Western Antarctic Peninsula....

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Identifying beaked whale foraging habitat in the Bahamas

This item was filled under Climate
Marine biologists have found that oceanographic and prey measurements can be used to identify beaked whale foraging habitat....

แจก ยูสเซอร์ พร้อม เครดิต ฟรี ไม่ ต้อง ฝากContinue reading...

Mercury converted to its most toxic form in ocean waters

New research has confirmed that a relatively harmless inorganic form of mercury found worldwide in ocean water is transformed into a potent neurotoxin in the seawater itself....

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Agulhas ocean current ‘leakage’, fueled by global warming, could stabilize Atlantic overturning circulation

This item was filled under Climate
The Agulhas Current which runs along the east coast of Africa may not be as well known as its counterpart in the Atlantic, the Gulf Stream, but researchers are now taking a much closer look at this current and its "leakage" from the Indian Ocean into the Atlantic Ocean. Agulhas Leakage could be a significant player in global climate variability, according to new research....

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Scientists can track origin of shark fins using ‘zip codes’ in their DNA

This item was filled under Climate
Scientists have used DNA to determine that groups of dusky sharks and copper sharks living in different coastal regions across the globe are separate populations of each species....

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Spirit of Volunteerism [Feature]

This item was filled under News
NOAA's mission is to "understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment and conserve and manage coastal and marine resources to meet our nation's economic, social, and environmental needs." This commitment to foster a healthy planet resides within NOAA's people, and thus in the offices, ships, fields, wetlands, and waterways where for 41 years they've conducted their wide range of work. But we wondered what sorts of volunteer activities our colleagues pursue in their free time and of their own accord. We were inspired by their far-reaching efforts to make a difference. We think you will be inspired, too....

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How can you tell the difference between an oil slick and an algal bloom?

This item was filled under Facts, Ocean Observations, Ocean Science, Technology
While it's relatively common to spot unidentified dark or reddish patches on the surface of the ocean in coastal areas around the U.S., it's not always easy to discern by sight what the substance is that's creating the disturbance.Often, offshore patches of discolored water are the result of algal blooms or oil slicks.

Algal blooms occur when colonies of algae—simple ocean plants that live in the sea—grow out of control. While algal blooms come in many colors (and some have no color at all), they are popularly known as 'red tides' because some are deep red in color.

Oil slicks, on the other hand, are simply films of oil floating on top of the water. While some slicks may be a few inches thick, most are thinner than a human hair. They may form naturally, but they are often introduced by man in incidents ranging from refined fuels or crude oil spilled from a ship to larger events such as last year's Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oil sometimes emulsifies under certain conditions. Emulsified oil is a mixture of oil and water that often resembles chocolate mousse or pudding.

How do you tell the difference? It can be difficult. Even the experts can be fooled, especially when looking at the ocean from an aircraft.

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Port Valdez invertebrates stabilized 26 years after Alaska’s great earthquake

This item was filled under Climate
It took 26 years for marine invertebrates living on the Port Valdez seafloor to stabilize after Alaska's Great Earthquake of 1964, according to a scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks....

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