Archive for July, 2011

Sea level rise less from Greenland, more from Antarctica, than expected during last interglacial

New research results are revealing surprising patterns of melting during the last interglacial period that suggest that Greenland's ice may be more stable -- and Antarctica's less stable -- than many thought....

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Researchers map long-range migrations and habitats of leatherback sea turtles in the Pacific Ocean

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Endangered leatherback sea turtles migrate and forage across vast areas of the Pacific Ocean and Indo-Pacific seas and require greater international collaboration for their protection, according to a recent study. The study is based on data from 126 leatherbacks tracked by satellite and supports continuing research to improve conservation efforts for this endangered species by better understanding how oceanographic features influence their migration and foraging behavior....

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Mitochondria share an ancestor with SAR11, a globally significant marine microbe

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A recent study provides strong evidence that mitochondria share a common evolutionary ancestor with a lineage of marine bacteria known as SAR11, arguably the most abundant group of microorganisms on Earth....

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Detailed picture of ice loss following the collapse of Antarctic ice shelves

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Researchers have combined data from multiple sources to provide the clearest account yet of how much glacial ice surges into the sea following the collapse of Antarctic ice shelves....

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Double jeopardy: Tuna and billfish

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Scientists present an alarming assessment of several economically important fish populations. The analysis of 61 commercially important species classified 7 species as threatened with extinction and 4 as "near threatened" for the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species....

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Identical virus, host populations can prevail for centuries

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A scientist, analyzing ancient plankton DNA signatures in sediments of the Black Sea, has found for the first time that the same genetic populations of a virus and its algal host can persist and coexist for centuries. The findings have implications for the ecological significance of viruses in shaping algae ecosystems in the ocean, and perhaps fresh water as well....

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Chemical make-up of Gulf of Mexico plume determined

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Taking another major step in sleuthing the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, scientists have determined what chemicals were contained in a deep, hydrocarbon-containing plume....

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Study shows small-scale fisheries’ impact on marine life

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Small-scale fisheries could pose a more serious threat to marine life than previously thought. Research shows that tens of thousands of turtles from across the Pacific are being captured through the activities of small-scale fisheries....

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Deep below the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: New molecular model better explains diffusion of spill under water

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For the first time, scientists gathered oil and gas directly as it escaped from a deep ocean wellhead -- that of the damaged Deepwater Horizon oil rig. What they found allows a better understanding of how pollution is partitioned and transported in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico and permits superior estimation of the environmental impact of escaping oil, allowing for a more precise evaluation of previously estimated repercussions on seafloor life in the future....

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2011 Gulf of Mexico ‘dead zone’ could be biggest ever

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Researchers have examined the scope and size of this year's "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico and have measured it currently to be about 3,300 square miles, or roughly the size of Delaware and Rhode Island combined, but some researchers anticipate it becoming much larger....

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