Archive for January, 2014

What is an anchialine pool?

This item was filled under Ecosystems, Facts, Ocean Observations, Places
An anchialine pool is an enclosed water body or pond with an underground connection to the ocean.

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Sea level variations escalating along eastern Gulf of Mexico coast

This item was filled under Climate
Around the globe, sea levels typically rise a little in summer and fall again in winter. Now, a new study shows that, from the Florida Keys to southern Alabama, those fluctuations have been intensifying over the past 20 years....

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Boaters Invited to Help Track Whale Movements

This item was filled under News
Yachters and sailors are invited to help scientists track the movements of endangered humpback whales between NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and its sister sanctuaries across the Caribbean as part of Carib Tails, a new international citizen science effort.

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Large, deep magma chamber discovered below Kilauea volcano: Largely unknown internal plumbing of volcanoes

This item was filled under Climate
A new study has uncovered a previously unknown magma chamber deep below the most active volcano in the world -- Kilauea. This is the first geophysical observation that large magma chambers exist in the deeper parts of the volcano system....

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New NASA laser technology reveals how ice measures up

This item was filled under Climate
A new photon-counting technique will allow researchers to track the melt or growth of Earth's frozen regions....

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New studies needed to predict how marine organisms may adapt to the future’s acidic oceans

This item was filled under Climate
The world's oceans are becoming more acidic, changing in a way that hasn't happened for millions of years. But will marine organisms from tiny coccolithophores to king crabs change along with the waters?...

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Living cold-water coral reef discovered off Greenland

This item was filled under Climate
By sheer coincidence, Canadian researchers have discovered a reef of living cold-water corals in southern Greenland. The first-ever Greenlandic reef is located in southwest Greenland and was formed by cold-water corals with hard limestone skeletons. There are several species of coral in Greenland, but this is the first time that an actual reef has been found....

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Is there an ocean beneath our feet? Ocean water may reach upper mantle through deep sea faults

This item was filled under Climate
Scientists have shown that deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from Earth's oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought....

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Changing climate: How dust changed the face of Earth

In spring 2010, the research icebreaker Polarstern returned from the South Pacific with a scientific treasure -- ocean sediments from a previously almost unexplored part of the South Polar Sea. What looks like an inconspicuous sample of mud to a layman is, to geological history researchers, a valuable archive from which they can reconstruct the climatic history of the polar areas over many years of analysis. This, in turn, is of fundamental importance for understanding global climatic development....

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Los Angeles would experience stronger-than-expected ground motion in major earthquake, virtual earthquake generator shows

This item was filled under Climate
Scientists have developed a new "virtual earthquake" technique and used it to confirm a prediction that Los Angeles would experience stronger-than-expected ground motion if a major quake occurred along the southern San Andreas Fault....

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